Cenote Calavera

"Skull Cave" (aka: Temple of Doom)

by Nicholas Hosken


Posted on 01 January 2018


Exploring the depths of Cenote Calavera

CAVERN - Max Depth: 30m/100ft   Avg Depth: 30m/199ft

CAVE - Max Depth: 60m/199ft,   Avg Depth: 60m/199ft

We begin this dive by literally jumping off a 3m/10ft ledge into the cool fresh water of the cenote below. Once our heads have popped back up, and we have all donned our scuba gear, we will begin our decent into the darkness. Initially we pass through a halocline at 10m/33ft into warmer salt water before fully entering into the large cavern underneath which boasts an average diameter of more than 50m/165ft. Look up at this point and you might notice the noonday sun shining through three holes in the ceiling giving the impression of a grining skull and giving the cenote its disturbing name.

Initially we come to a talus cone which in cave and cavern diving talk, refers to a mound of debris often found near entrances. On top of this cone you’ll find a static cavern line which starts at a depth of around 6m/20ft before leading down through a halocline at 10m/33ft into warmer salt water below and finally bringing you to the cavern underneath at 16m/52ft. This massive cavity boasts an average diameter of more than 50m/165ft. While you explore its beautiful walls, don’t forget to look up at this point and you might notice the noonday sun shining through three holes in the ceiling giving the impression of a grinning skull and giving the cenote its disturbing Spanish name: Cenote Calavera (Skull Cave).

Unlike many other cenotes, Casavera has an abundance of life in its waters and much of it is as interested in you as you are in them - don't be surprised if the fish swim within inches of your mask just as much interest in you as you have in them.

"If you only have got one day for cavern diving here visit this place. Unforgettable experience!"


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Cenotes (Cave & Cavern Diving)
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